Leave Young Wildlife Alone

by
posted on May 15, 2017
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The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation would like to remind outdoor enthusiasts to leave young animals alone. Oftentimes when people interfere with young animals that seem to be alone, the parents are merely nearby...and people do more harm than good. In Oklahoma people begin to see fawns around mid to late June. You may see them alone.

Here's what Jena Donnell, wildlife diversity information specialist for the Wildlife Department had to say:

"When you see newborn wildlife that appears to be alone, such as a fawn, a young squirrel or a fledgling bird, chances are the adults are nearby and simply waiting for you to move along so they can care for their young. It is common for fawns to be left in a safe place while does feed nearby, and interfering with that always causes more harm than good."

This message goes for all states. It is always better to let nature care for it's own.

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