Wild-Game Recipe: Turkey Gumbo

by
posted on March 8, 2019
gumbo.jpg

One thing you quickly learn about preparing game meat—be it red meat or fowl—is that it is almost always very lean and therefore dry. For too many years the idea of a low-fat or completely non-fat meal has been the diet du jour. Fact is, we need some fat in our diets, and meat can be pretty dry and tasteless without a little fat. Wild turkey is typically quite dry as it comes off the bird. Sure, you can roast it and make it decent by adding supplemental fats, but for those of us who appreciate a bit of spice in our meals, a Cajun-style turkey gumbo will be a big hit at a spring dinner table.

I’ll warn you at the get-go: Making the roux can be a bit labor intensive, but after that the recipe is pretty simple, and with the gumbo over some long-grain and wild rice—well, don’t expect to have leftovers. Here is a great way to serve up that great big, old longbeard.

Put together the following ingredients:

  1. 1 1/8 cups vegetable oil
  2. 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  3. 1 1/2 cups chopped onion
  4. 1 cup chopped celery
  5. 1 cup chopped green bell pepper
  6. 1/2 teaspoon salt
  7. 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
  8. 1 pound smoked sausage, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  9. 3 bay leaves
  10. 6 cups turkey stock
  11. 3 1/2 cups coarsely chopped leftover turkey
  12. 1 tablespoon filé powder (If you like your gumbo really spicy, you can double this)
  13. 1 3/4 cups uncooked long-grained and wild rice
  14. 2 cups water
  15. 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  16. 1/2 cup chopped green onions

 

Directions

  1. Stir oil and flour together in a large, heavy-bottomed pot—I use a 5-quart Dutch oven to spread out the heat and keep the roux from burning—over medium heat. Cook, stirring slowly and constantly to keep the roux from burning, until the mixture becomes a dark chocolate brown, about 25 minutes. In the meantime, put the turkey stock in a slow cooker or crock pot and begin to heat it slowly. Add the onions, celery, bell peppers and the roux all at once to the turkey stock, and continue to stir until vegetables are wilted, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and cayenne pepper.
  2. Stir in the smoked sausage and bay leaves, and continue to stir for 3 to 4 minutes. Put on high heat until the gumbo comes to a soft boil; then reduce heat to medium-low. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 1 hour. Stir in the turkey and the filé powder; simmer for 2 hours.
  3. About 30 minutes before serving, bring the rice and water to a boil in a saucepan over high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the rice is tender, and the liquid has been absorbed, 20 to 25 minutes. If you have one, a rice cooker helps a lot and does the job much quicker.
  4. Skim off any fat that rises to the surface of the gumbo; remove from heat. Stir in the parsley and green onions. Remove the bay leaves, and serve the gumbo in deep bowls with rice.

Latest

Courtesy Winchester Repeating Arms Facebook
Courtesy Winchester Repeating Arms Facebook

What's the Difference Between Gas-Operated & Inertia-Driven Shotguns?

A semi-auto is a semi-auto, right? Not exactly. Each shotgun type has its pros and cons; here's what newbies need to know.

What is FITASC?

Well, for starters, one of the toughest clay target sports in the world...

Exzellent! American Junior Shotgunners Triumph in Germany

USA Shooting’s junior shotgun athletes earned six medals at the ISSF Junior World Cup.

7 Pistol-Shooting Tips For People With Arthritis

Don't let "Uncle Arthur" get between you and the sport you love.

NRA Family Favorites: May 21, 2022

We love our readers ... and we also love to read! Here are some of our favorite stories from around the whole family of NRA publications this past week.

Video Review: Colt King Cobra Target Revolver

This precision wheelgun was designed for sharpshooters, but it's versatile enough for so much more.

Interests



Get the best of NRA Family delivered to your inbox.